It’s Not Just a Job, It’s an Adventure!

Last week, Mike briefly blogged about the current job openings at OWCN. If you are a regular reader on this site, you know that there have been a number of blogs over the last half year devoted to goodbyes and thank you’s. Friends and colleagues who were formerly key members of the OWCN Management Team have moved on to new and exciting chapters in their lives. Those of us who remain are excited for everything we already have planned for 2018, but we are even more excited to find out who will join our team and what new experience, knowledge, perspective, ideas and enthusiasm they will bring with them.SilhoutesI can honestly say that working at OWCN is never boring or unfulfilling. Each day dawns with tremendous potential. Many days end with my accomplishing little that I planned at the start of the day, but always succeeding in doing something that will make a difference to animals at risk from oil spills in California or around the world.  And that is true for everyone on our team, though, perhaps, we don’t always recognize it. The OWCN Management team is made up of individuals with a wide range of skills, values, and viewpoints and working with them is a unique experience. Every person on our team is expected to be a leader, providing vision and innovation when called upon but easily adapting to take on whatever task is needed to successfully produce Oilapalooza, wash an oiled snake, or do an interview on the radio.

IMGP0107The beauty of working here is you never know what your day will be, but you can bet it won’t be boring. There are few jobs where one night you might be out on the ocean catching murres with the moon just rising, the following week teaching 6 graders about oiled wildlife, and the month after, training oiled wildlife responders in Mexico or Azerbaijan.

2014-12-04 11.35.37 I don’t mean to say that working at OWCN is all fun and games, every single day – it is not.  It can be very hard work, especially during an oil spill activation, with animal lives in the balance. But I think most of us here thrive on wanting to do everything within our power to help prepare for the next spill, which will ultimately help save more animals – our ultimate goal.  So if this sounds like you, who you would like to be, or a team you would like to be part of, I hope you will apply for one of the 3 openings!

-Curt

Responder Specialist:
Final filing dates for the Readiness Coordinator and Vet positions will be 19 January 2018, and the Responder Specialist due 22 January 2018.

Join the OWCN Team!

The OWCN is currently recruiting for two career positions at this time: a Readiness Coordinator and a Facility Veterinarian. A third position (Responder Specialist) will be posted shortly. Details on these positions can be found on the following links:
Final filing dates for these positions will be 19 January 2018.
-Mike

Farewell OWCN!

Justin Cox (Fourth from right) joining the rest of the OWCN team during the pre-drill festivities in Quincy, CA

I’ve managed communications for the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, which is home to Oiled Wildlife Care Network, for the past four years. About halfway through my tenure, I booked a week-and-a-half long vacation so that the band I play in could go on a 10-date tour. The first of those shows was on May 20, 2015, which is not an insignificant timeframe for the OWCN.

That’s one day after a pipeline burst and the Refugio Oil Spill began! Of course! I spent the next two days making phone calls and sending emails to put the ducks in a row – coordinating with the UC Davis communications team to make sure they could send people down there to capture photos and document our team’s work.

To take matters to their logical extreme, the bulk of the OWCN team was at a conference in Alaska when the pipe ruptured. They had to fly down in waves as the severity of the spill became clear and seats opened up on flights. Some flew to Davis first to prep equipment and transport it to the spill. I was there to watch Kyra and Tim pack the MASH and head south. Fast and efficient from top to bottom. It was cool to watch.

I reflect on this today because, after four years in my position, I am moving on to an exciting opportunity with the SeaDoc Society in the Pacific Northwest. It’s another Wildlife Health Center program, so I’ll still be part of the family.

I’ve always found the OWCN to be interesting (compared to the many other programs I work with at the WHC) in that there is this constant need for readiness because disaster can come at any time, and those disasters can take many shapes and sizes.

That constant need for improvement is abundantly clear at the Network’s yearly full-deployment drills, where every fathomable curveball gets thrown just to make sure the team has the skills to hit them. If there’s a swing and a miss, then it’s time to talk about ways to improve for next time. That cycle is endless.

There’s no way to ever be 100% prepared, especially with the expansion to inland spill response and the many threats posed by rail transport, but the OWCN does an impressive job of getting as close as possible, and never resting on their laurels.

That extends beyond animal response and care. They manage databases, run trainings, mobilize teams and even handle the bulk of their communications on their own. The fact that they maintain a weekly blog is impressive given their array of other responsibilities. During Refugio, the team provided updates on social media, answered important questions via blog posts and responded to requests from the media.

By the time I made it down to San Pedro where dozens of oiled pelicans were recovering, the most urgent work had been done. The team had seized upon the unfortunate reality of the spill and used it as an opportunity to put trackers on a selection of pelicans to monitor their behavior and survival after the spill. Those results will inform and improve future oil spill responses. Such is the quest for steady improvement at the OWCN. I feel lucky to have worked alongside this team.

I plan on refreshing my HAZWOPER certification in the coming month, so if/when a big one happens, drop me a line and ask my new boss to send me down with a camera and a notepad!

-Justin Cox

NOTE: Me and the entire OWCN team wants to sincerely thank Justin for his behind-the-scenes professional telling of our story over the past several years, and wishes him and his family the best of luck in his new adventure with our sister organization up north on Orcas Island! And, yes, I will be on the phone with Joe Gaydos when we need him! – Mike

OWCN Full Deployment Drill Coming to Sunny San Diego

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Over the past few weeks, we have begun the initial planning for our next OWCN Full Deployment Drill (FDD), which will be held on Wednesday, January 31st, 2018.  Since our last FDD was held up in Quincy in the pouring rain in March, we figured there is no better place to be in January than in sunny San Diego!

We have successfully pre-identified and filled all our area lead roles for the exercise, but wanted to give everyone (and especially those located in Region 5, a.k.a. Southern California) a heads-up that we will be sending out an email in early January announcing some volunteer opportunities and posting them to our responder database. So keep an eye out if you live in the San Diego area and are interested!
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However, if you are available and interested in participating as a volunteer, please remember that you must have the following pre-requisites:

  • have an active and current responder profile in our database, and
  • have completed all 3 of the online Core Webinar Series (OWCN Overview, Spill Basics, and Responder Involvement)

Volunteers will be assisting in all areas of the drill including field operations, transportation, field stabilization, and Care & Processing (intake, prewash, wash, conditioning and support).

10558159185_fd28abac06_zWe are looking forward to drilling both the San Diego region as well as the Oiled Wildlife Care Center (located at SeaWorld San Diego).  And a special thanks to our SeaWorld San Diego folks, as they have been extra helpful and accommodating during the planning process.

The OWCN management team wishes you all a fantastic holiday season, and we look forward to seeing many of you in San Diego in 2018!

-Scott

 

New OWCN-IBR Collaboration Seems Like Old Times

Last month I traveled with Barbara Callahan from OWCN Member Organization International Bird Rescue (IBR) to Baku, Azerbaijan. What made this training especially significant was that this was the first international training project that OWCN and IBR collaborated on as partners from start to finish. Our mission was to help increase the level of preparedness for oiled wildlife response in that country. We were there on behalf of BP, the managing partner of the BTC Pipeline Company. The pipeline runs from south of Baku on the Caspian Sea to the Lesser Caucasus Mountains through Georgia and then to the Ceyhan Terminal in Turkey on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea.

 

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BTC Pipeline (Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan)

City of contrasts (1)

City of contrasts: the old and the new

It was not the first time I had been to this corner of the world, and over the years I have come to appreciate this city of contrasts and of seemingly constant change. Simply looking at the skyline provides evidence of the immense influence of oil on this city and country.

While the OWCN continues to expand within California and along with our Member Organizations, we work to increase our readiness and improve our capacity for spills, we are also seeking opportunities to leverage our knowledge and experience to help other areas of the world as well. Through collaborations as represented with this training, as well as other projects we are involved with, such as the Global Oiled Wildlife Response System, we are working to share our knowledge as well as bring back the experiences of those we meet around the world.

The training in Baku included more than 100 participants from a diversity of NGOs, government agencies and industry (a few if them include the Institute of Geology, the Baku Zoo, the Ministry of Emergency Situations, Baku Veterinary Department, the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, the Azerbaijan Society for the Protection of Animals, the Institute of Zoology, BP, State Oil Company of Azerbaijan and many more).  These various groups came together during the training to learn basic concepts of oiled wildlife response and to develop basic plans for setting up a wildlife facility.  The diversity of backgrounds and participant age enriched the discussion with a variety of perspectives, opinions and questions, increasing the learning and enjoyment for us all.

Facility plan team

Developing a facility plan

Facility exercise AZ training

Presenting the plan to the class

The third day was a hands-on field exercise on a windy Caspian Sea beach outside of the city where nearly 50 participants practiced in the capture of birds and mammals, provided first responder aid to captured wildlife, and made decisions on transport to wildlife facilities.

Caspian seal capture AZ exercise

Exercise: Capturing a seal

This training provided everyone, myself included, with a better understanding of what an oiled wildlife response in Azerbaijan would be like. All in all, a very worthwhile endeavor. I hope the OWCN will have more opportunities to collaborate with International Bird Rescue and other organizations to share our collective experiences.  It is only in collaborating and sharing experiences that we can move forward along the never-ending road to best achievable care.

Curt

Thank You!

Picture1Today, on the eve of Thanksgiving, we give THANKS to all of our Member Organizations, Affiliated Agencies, and collaborators for helping make the Oiled Wildlife Care Network the amazing organization that it is today.  As a network organization, it is the sum of its parts that makes the OWCN whole.  As we all know, California is a big state, and to be ready for an oil spill anywhere in the state, we rely on all our Member Organizations, each with trained personnel and/or facilities to have the ability to respond to an emergency that affects our wildlife.  As the saying goes, “it takes a village”, and in this case that is certainly true.  You all are the Village (with a capital “V”!), and we are ever so thankful.

So as we enter this Thanksgiving holiday, we want to wish you a joyful and memorable time with friends and family.  And since you all are family, know just how grateful we are for each and every one of you.

-Kyra

 

Duck-umentaries!

This past weekend, Greg Frankfurter and I had a wonderful opportunity to learn some new tricks from some of our USGS (United States Geological Service) colleagues who work on Mare Island (near Vallejo, CA). Before getting down to business, Susan De La Cruz showed us around her historic workplace: The Mare Island Transmitter Site for US Radio NPG. During its heyday, it served as one of the main Pacific radio transmitter stations between ships and shore commands. Its seen better days, but is still a fascinating remnant of a bygone era.

 

 

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The true purpose of our trip was to meet up with Susan, her team and Paul Gibbons, DVM. Susan’s team uses radiotelemetry to better understand the ecology and movements of waterbirds and applies this information to enhance conservation efforts.

To learn more about radiotelemetry, click on the video below. Note, although I chose this clip because I found it informative, yet amusing, it introduces radiotelemetry using a VHF radio signal. These days Susan’s team relies mostly on transmitters that use signals from satellites, but there is a whole variety of tracking options that exist today.

Dr. Paul has historically provided the veterinary services for the project and thus, Greg, I and another wildlife veterinarian (Maris Brenn-White, DVM) were there to learn about his technique for placing transmitters. Since the ducks decided to outsmart the team by refusing to be interested in the delicious corn placed the inside the live traps, we moved on to plan B…which was to practice using cadavers.

 

 

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In the end, it was a successful day for all. And as a bonus, three more veterinarians are trained to help out…should the ducks ever decide to be hungry!

–Nancy