A little more reaching out

Wednesday I had a chance to work with the WAAM Club (Wildlife and Aquatic Animal Medicine) from the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. This Club is organized by veterinary students that are interested in aquatic, zoo, wildlife medicine. I teamed up with veterinarians from the Sacramento Zoo (Drs. Ray Wack, Anne Burgdorf and Katie Delk) to offer a wetlab on the placement of intraosseous catheters in birds. One of the advantages that intraosseous (e.g. within the bone) catheters have over the more commonly used intravascular catheters is that they are excellent for use in small sized animals that are suffering from shock. These patients have small veins to begin with, so when their blood pressure is low, such as when suffering from shock or blood loss, it can be almost impossible to thread a catheter into a blood vessel. Luckily bones don’t collapse. Plus, except for pneumatic (air filled) bones in birds, most other limb bones are filled with bone marrow. These bone marrow cavities are directly connected to large central veins, so inserting a small rigid catheter into one of these bones is equivalent to establishing a central venous catheter. This is a valuable technique to teach future veterinarians, because sometimes, it is the only way that intravenous fluids or other medications can be administered to severely debilitated oiled seabirds. –Nancy

Initial lecture for intraosseous catheter placement wetlab with Wildlife and Aquatic Animal Medicine Club at the School of Veterinary Medicine at UCDavis

Initial lecture for intraosseous catheter placement wetlab with Wildlife and Aquatic Animal Medicine Club at the School of Veterinary Medicine at UCDavis

Pointing out site to insert an ulnar intraosseous catheter to a WAAM veterinary student
Pointing out site to insert an ulnar intraosseous catheter to a WAAM veterinary student
Palpating the wing to determine the proper site to insert an intraosseous catheter

Palpating the wing to determine the proper site to insert an intraosseous catheter

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