What We Don’t Know… Yet

This week is a week of meetings for the OWCN Management Team. Today, I spent the day sitting in on the OWCN’s Scientific Advisory Committee meeting. Tomorrow, I’ll spend the day at our Advisory Board meeting.  Meetings aren’t usually my favorite way to pass the time, but I’m always excited to see these two on the calendar.

For those of you who might be unfamiliar with these groups, the Advisory Board provides expertise, leadership, and guidance for the administration of the program overall, while the Scientific Advisory Committee evaluates and makes recommendations regarding the OWCN’s Research and Competitive Grants Program.

feather testingIt’s the Scientific Advisory Committee that is particularly fun to sit in on, because this is where knowledgeable and committed scientists from all sorts of backgrounds gather to review the year’s grant applications. There’s always lively discussion about each proposal, and listening to really smart people passionately discuss complex topics is something I’ve always enjoyed. But more than that, I am fascinated by the glimpse the research proposals give me into the future of oiled wildlife response.

Research is based on questions, and there are an awful lot of questions we don’t have good answers to in wildlife rehabilitation and oiled wildlife response. What does oil actually do to this species, and how can we best help the animal to recover? Is this diet actually the best one for this species and situation? Can we find and help oiled animals faster if we use new technology like drones? Is there a better way of treating or preventing care-related complications, like Aspergillus respiratory infections?

COMU eye examsExperience and adaptive husbandry have their place, but there’s nothing like a well-designed study to help us understand what we do and don’t really know about a topic – which is why OWCN strives to not only base our protocols and procedures on the best science available, but also to seek out and fund projects that will deepen our collective understanding of the issues around oiled wildlife response. Constant development and improvement is core to our mission and organizational identity, and the scientific advancement of the oiled wildlife response field is a fundamental component of that process.

Tomorrow, the Advisory Board will review the Scientific Advisory Committee’s recommendations and will vote on whether or not to fund this year’s grant proposals. I’m excited to see what the final decisions are, but even more excited to see what grows out of the grant and research program – this year, and in the future.

Take care,

Steph

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